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my self-publishing journey Entering September of 2015, Tommy Black and the Staff of Light had sold less than 200 books and was sputtering along with no real hope for a future. Book two, Tommy Black and the Coat of Invincibility, was delayed to a January 2016 release, and I had a final plan to kickstart the[…]

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my self-publishing journey In my last column I noted that traditional publishing marketing methods had turned out to be ineffective. I had sent out copies of the book to over 200 book bloggers. I advertised and promoted in social media. I even used Google, Bing, and Facebook for advertising. In the end nothing seemed to really[…]

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Thoughts on the genre from J.K. Ullrich, whose Blue Karma is a finalist in the 2015 Shelf Unbound Competition for Best Indie Book by J.K. Ullrich In the carnival of literature, science fiction is the House of Mirrors, inviting readers to explore distorted reflections of their own world. The genre’s classics reveal a timeline of[…]

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Thoughts on “cli-fi” from the guy who coined the term by Dan Bloom What is climate fiction? Canadian novelist Margaret Atwood asked that question a few months ago, posing this riddle: Is “cli-fi” a genre, a meme, a motif or a buzzword? I don’t think she really wanted or expected an answer. I think she[…]

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University of Virgina Presshttp://upress.virginia.edu Although Michael Crichton’s State of Fear is neither high literature nor scientifically accurate, it may well be the most important climate change novel yet written. Driven by Crichton’s reputation as the author of Jurassic Park and creator of the television show ER, over 1.5 million copies were printed in the United[…]

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my self-publishing journey In my last column on self-publishing I described the various grassroots methods I was using to get my middle grade novel, Tommy Black and the Staff of Light, noticed. It is important to note that my theory of a spark that lights a fire requires that the spark actually catch. It is[…]

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On view through August 23 at the Brooklyn Museum in New York, this exhibit for the first time showcases notebook pages that contain Basquiat’s early exploration of imagery that would be come iconic in his later large-scale works: teepees, crowns, skeletons. A catalog from Skira Rizzoli accompanies the exhibit. brooklynmuseum.org. 

by Dieter Buchhart In 1984, Basquiat began to collaborate intensely with Andy Warhol. The partnership was originally proposed by influential art dealer Bruno Bischofberger, Basquiat’s European gallerist. In 1984 and 1985, Basquiat produced fifteen joint works with  Warhol and Francesco Clemente, and more than 140 collaborations with Warhol; these comprise more than one-tenth of Basquiat’s[…]

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Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), author, critic, and editor, is best known today for his collaboration with Mark Twain on The Gilded Age (1873). Born in Plainfield, Massachusetts, on September 12, 1829, Warner worked on his guardian’s farm from ages eight to twelve, an experience that informs the memoir Being a Boy (1877). After graduating from Hamilton College in 1851, Warner, hoping[…]

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Walking the Labyrinth  Our associate editor Marc Schuster on writing The Greatest Show in the Galaxy: The Discerning Fan’s Guide to Doctor Who with Tom Powers Tom answered the door in gold tights and angel wings. When he showed me inside, every room was filled with junk: marionettes, model spaceships, painted rocks. I might not have[…]

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