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HOME REMEDIES: STORIES  By Xuan Juliana Wang       The twelve stories in Xuan Juliana Wang’s remarkable debut collection capture the unheard voices of a new generation of Chinese youth. A generation for whom the Cultural Revolution is a distant memory, WeChat is king, and life glitters with the possibility of love, travel, technology, and,[…]

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My New Beginning by DL Graser I always thought about writing a children’s book, but never stopped my busy life to begin the journey. As years passed by I wondered if I would ever take that first step to fulfill this dream. One night a few years ago I was awaken very early to a[…]

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On view through August 23 at the Brooklyn Museum in New York, this exhibit for the first time showcases notebook pages that contain Basquiat’s early exploration of imagery that would be come iconic in his later large-scale works: teepees, crowns, skeletons. A catalog from Skira Rizzoli accompanies the exhibit. brooklynmuseum.org. 

by Dieter Buchhart In 1984, Basquiat began to collaborate intensely with Andy Warhol. The partnership was originally proposed by influential art dealer Bruno Bischofberger, Basquiat’s European gallerist. In 1984 and 1985, Basquiat produced fifteen joint works with  Warhol and Francesco Clemente, and more than 140 collaborations with Warhol; these comprise more than one-tenth of Basquiat’s[…]

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Charles Dudley Warner (1829-1900), author, critic, and editor, is best known today for his collaboration with Mark Twain on The Gilded Age (1873). Born in Plainfield, Massachusetts, on September 12, 1829, Warner worked on his guardian’s farm from ages eight to twelve, an experience that informs the memoir Being a Boy (1877). After graduating from Hamilton College in 1851, Warner, hoping[…]

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Walking the Labyrinth  Our associate editor Marc Schuster on writing The Greatest Show in the Galaxy: The Discerning Fan’s Guide to Doctor Who with Tom Powers Tom answered the door in gold tights and angel wings. When he showed me inside, every room was filled with junk: marionettes, model spaceships, painted rocks. I might not have[…]

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Before the publication of Jules Verne’s From the Earth to the Moon (1865) and Around the Moon (1869), literary journeys to the moon and planets were almost exclusively limited to allegory, fantasy or satire. Two things were needed to change fantasy into reality. First, there needed to be solid, scientific knowledge about the actual conditions[…]

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