Review: Queenie by Candice Carty-Williams

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Queenie’s world falling is falling apart. She is at her wits end. Messing up at work. Messing up with her boyfriend. Messing up with her friends; her parents. 

Dispite it all she finds a way to put her life back together. 

Queenie teaches readers to navigate whats seems impossible. To find the strength they need to power through tough situations when everything seems to being going wrong.

From dealing with anxiety to difficult family, Queenie teaches us to let go of the things and the people whose presence in your life is more harm than good. 

NAMED ONE OF THE MOST ANTICIPATED BOOKS OF 2019 BY WOMAN’S DAY, NEWSDAY PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, BUSTLE, AND BOOK RIOT! 

Queenie Jenkins is a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman living in London, straddling two cultures and slotting neatly into neither. She works at a national newspaper, where she’s constantly forced to compare herself to her white middle class peers. 

After a messy break up from her long-term white boyfriend, Queenie seeks comfort in all the wrong places…including several hazardous men who do a good job of occupying brain space and a bad job of affirming self-worth.

About The Author

Candice Carty-Williams was born in 1989, the result of an affair between a Jamaican cab driver who barely speaks and a Jamaican-Indian dyslexic receptionist who speaks more than anyone else in the world. She studied Media at Sussex because her sixth form teachers said that she wasn’t clever enough to do English, but she showed them all by first working at the Guardian Guide and then moving into publishing at 23. 

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